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What app or software can I use on my windows 10 computer(desktop) or iPhone 7 latest software to scan for interference as in another device effecting my frequencie of my Bluetooth wifi in a 2.4 and 5 hz range.

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closed as too broad by Marcus Müller, Timtech, Scott Earle, Phil Frost - W8II, rclocher3 Jan 5 '17 at 19:07

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't want to be rude, but if you want to scan for "interference", then you most likely are not qualified to interpret scan results, even if you mange to actually get them. First step you need to take is to very clearly define what you actually mean by "interference" and explain that. Hopefully, we'll be able to tell you if that makes any sense or not. Also be careful. There's an entire industry dedicated to separating people, who have a vague idea that there's some "interference", and their money. So please be extra careful. $\endgroup$ – AndrejaKo Dec 25 '16 at 17:09
  • $\begingroup$ After this explanation, Kevin's answer and comments, and other comments: closing to vote this question as unclear, since OP passed several chances to clarify when explicitly asked to. $\endgroup$ – Marcus Müller Dec 26 '16 at 8:05
  • $\begingroup$ I agree with Marcus - this question makes no sense. $\endgroup$ – Rory Alsop Dec 26 '16 at 23:21
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You can't.

The radios built into computers are very special purpose, and they generally can only report RSSI or other information about signals in the intended mode (WiFi, Bluetooth, etc.) and not arbitrary RF energy.

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  • $\begingroup$ What kind of radio would I need that would be best for doing this? $\endgroup$ – Little Mac Dec 24 '16 at 4:10
  • $\begingroup$ @LittleMac Could you edit your question to ask that? $\endgroup$ – Kevin Reid AG6YO Dec 24 '16 at 15:36
  • $\begingroup$ I want to check for interference around my house, and I have a couple iPhones and a hp computer. I need to know if I can scan for interference $\endgroup$ – Little Mac Dec 25 '16 at 10:07
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    $\begingroup$ @LittleMac Please edit your question to say that; don't just leave a comment. Also, what kind of interference — interference with WiFi? Bluetooth? FM radio? et cetera. $\endgroup$ – Kevin Reid AG6YO Dec 25 '16 at 12:47
  • $\begingroup$ @LittleMac -- are you wanting to scan for interference, known as RFI for radio frequency interference which is caused by un-intentional generation of radio signals. Or, are you wanting to scan for a jamming signal to see if someone is purposely jamming your cell phone signal? Different methods and techniques are used depending on the type of interference. Also note that in the US, there are stiff fines (~ $100,000) and prison time if caught purposely jamming cellular service. Therefore, if you think you are being purposely jammed, contact your cellular carrier and they will test for you $\endgroup$ – K7PEH Dec 26 '16 at 5:52
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If by "desktop" you mean an ordinary PC, then you can get a (cheap) SDR dongle (see http://www.rtl-sdr.com/) and then you can use any of the SDR programs, preferably with waterfall display around suspected interference frequency. There are also some Android apps, I do not know about iPhone.

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    $\begingroup$ Note that RTL-SDRs don't go up to 2.4 GHz, let alone 5, so can't help with interference with e.g. WiFi. $\endgroup$ – Kevin Reid AG6YO Dec 24 '16 at 15:37
  • $\begingroup$ But do they go down to 2.4 Hz? $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Dec 26 '16 at 2:26
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    $\begingroup$ @Phil_Frost I assume it's a typo, since 2.4 Hz is ridiculously low as a radio frequency. But anyway, typical cheap SDR dongles go down to tens MHz. $\endgroup$ – Radovan Garabík Dec 26 '16 at 14:54
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I have used SDR# (read: Software Defined Radio Sharp) on a Windows 10 desktop to scan for signals, while doing so seeing how the noise floor changes dramatically. SDR# uses the waterfall display to help visualize noise, which would help one who isn't experienced in these sort of things be successful. In one case, I used SDR# to identify a noisy power supply that kept me from hearing a distant radio source.

The effectiveness of SDR# is related to the receiver you're using. While I was using an inexpensive TV tuner receiver, the range of the very cheap receivers are not created equally, so shop around.

While outside the scope of your question, I would like to add that the fun that can be had with SDR in general can be addictive. There are better receivers out there and an inexpensive raspberry pi project can also be built to accomplish the same thing if you need a more portable solution.

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