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Presumably setting up a 1m high antenna in a back garden isn't going to be an issue, but setting up an 80m high antenna would likely cause complaints! How high an antenna can I legally construct in the UK without going through the route of applying for planning permission (or other related red tape obstacles?)

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  • $\begingroup$ In my country (Canada) it's municipal (city, town, borough) level regulations/bylaws that have the most effect on such things. Read the whole of your country's legal guidance, and talk to your local HAM club to find out how to proceed. $\endgroup$ – Warren VE3WPX Feb 25 '14 at 0:50
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The "official" Government Guidance is pretty clear (for once):

Unless your house (or the building in which you live) is in a designated area, you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as:

  • there will be no more than two antennas on the property overall. (These may be on the front or back of the building, on the roof, attached to the chimney, or in the garden);
  • if you are installing a single antenna, it is not more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • if you are installing two antennas, one is not more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension, and the other is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • the cubic capacity of each individual antenna is not more than 35 litres;
  • an antenna fitted onto a chimney stack is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension;
  • and an antenna mounted on the roof only sticks out above the roof when there is a chimney-stack. In this case, the antenna should not stick out more than 60 centimetres above the highest part of the roof, or above the highest part of the chimney stack, whichever is lower.

Note that linear dimension is defined as including "only the antenna itself and not any attachment needed to fix it to the wall or roof, or connect it up to your equipment" - so any pole is irrelevant, just the antenna on top. A tower will be a different matter though!

Unfortunately 100cm is not really much use for amateur radio (certainly not HF)...

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    $\begingroup$ Note that this is all you're guaranteed. You might be able to put up something much more ambitious, and as long as nobody around you complains then you can leave it up. If it's up for four years then any later complaints will not have a good chance of forcing you to take the antenna down. Keep receipts and work orders, and take pictures of it with children, license plates, or other things that change over time when you set it up, hope for the best, and you might be able to keep it. $\endgroup$ – Adam Davis Dec 12 '13 at 17:42

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