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This question already has an answer here:

I got my amateur license back in the early '80s, primarily for putting it on my resume for an electronics job. Never used it outside of developing my Morse code speed, and once I got my Advanced Class and short call sign, I never used it again.

Well I'm retired now, and I plan on traveling the US while living long-term in an Airstream RV. Are there any constraints or gotchas I should be aware of when it comes to having no fixed address for years at a time?

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marked as duplicate by Phil Frost - W8II, Kevin Reid AG6YO Mar 29 '17 at 14:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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The only thing you need to do is make sure you can receive mail at the mailing address on your license, because that is part of the obligation of holding a license. It doesn't have to be your ‘residence’ or your true address in any sense; you can put down the address of a friend who'll read it for you and notify you of anything important, and that'll satisfy your obligation.

That's it! Have fun!

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The relevant regulation is §97.23:

Each license grant must show the grantee's correct name and mailing address. The mailing address must be in an area where the amateur service is regulated by the FCC and where the grantee can receive mail delivery by the United States Postal Service. Revocation of the station license or suspension of the operator license may result when correspondence from the FCC is returned as undeliverable because the grantee failed to provide the correct mailing address.

So you can be wherever you want, but you need to be able to respond to mail sent to the address registered to your license.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't see anything in that regulation snippet that supports your argument that the license holder would "need to be able to respond to mail sent to the address registered to your license". Only that the license holder must be able to receive mail which is sent to that address. That's a significant difference. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Apr 1 '16 at 21:17
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure there is any regulation that says you need to respond. However, if the FCC is mailing you, it's probably because you are in violation of some regulation, and if you fail to take action, you'll probably get your license revoked. Not that you'd ever know, if you weren't watching your mail, until the radio police come to get you. $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Apr 1 '16 at 21:45

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