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The maximum data rate on UHF is 56kbaud. This is well over most "high-speed" 9600 baud transmissions.

Is it possible to use two receivers at one site, and two transmitters (vice versa when the packets come back) to double the baud rate?

The transmiter/receiver pairs would obviously have to be on different frequencies to avoid doubling.

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  • $\begingroup$ Good idea - the two bands could run in the same direction to improve bandwidth, or could run in opposite directions, to have full duplex. I've never heard of this being done with standard packet radios though. $\endgroup$ – tomnexus Jul 25 '15 at 5:57
  • $\begingroup$ The only issue with the full duplex idea is I would need a duplexer at each end to prevent desense, and they aren't cheap. $\endgroup$ – Skyler 440 Jul 26 '15 at 14:19
  • $\begingroup$ Why is the maximum data rate 56 kb/s? See broadband-hamnet.org and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shannon%E2%80%93Hartley_theorem $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Jul 27 '15 at 15:59
  • $\begingroup$ I should have been more specific, for my purpose it would be the 70cm band, but the question applies to any band as well. $\endgroup$ – Skyler 440 Jul 28 '15 at 3:31
  • $\begingroup$ The maximum data rate with what kind of modulation? -- By the way, the 802.11ac standard (one of the many WiFi standards) on 2.4 GHz (which is technically still UHF) can transfer data at 96.3 Mbps on a 20 MHz wide channel. Of course 20 MHz channel width is way too much for 70cm band. $\endgroup$ – Ale HB9TST Jul 28 '15 at 23:10
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What you're talking about is called "Link aggregation." It's done all the time in the LAN/WAN industry, but I hadn't heard of it being done on ham radio (which isn't to say it isn't being done.)

And for hb9tst, the reason for the 56k limit is the FCC. Part 97 limits the data rate to 56k baud on 70cm (the band the questioner is using.)

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Yes, you would need to conform to local regulations (ex. in the US you are often required to transmit your callsign at regular intervals), but if you had software on both sides that could do load balancing, there is no technical reason why it could not be accomplished.

Perhaps look into protocols and compression for higher data rates? :)

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Yes it possible it's called MIMO technology (Multiple Input Multiple Output) used for 3G and above standards and new WIFI norms

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