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Using a high-Q LC circuit to match impedance is more efficient than a ferrite transformer, however it is very narrow banded compared to a ferrite transformer.

The statement above is...?

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The statement above is...?

True or false, depending on the losses of these components at any given operational frequency, and the bandwidths you need to achieve, as well as the impedance curve of both sides to be matched.

"High-Q" tries to suggest losses of the LC matcher are low, but that's at best a gross simplification; the only thing it really states is that it's a bad matching circuit as soon as you deviate from the resonant frequency a tiny bit; and that implies both low bandwidth as well as strong dependency on time and temperature.

Sure, at VHF frequencies, old ferrite cores are lossy. But who says that we're in a frequency range where that is a problem? As a matter of fact, you will find for example mini-circuit transformers in the matching circuits of multi-thousand dollar radio front ends up to several GHz.

So, no general statement can be made. Any sensible radio engineer will look at the actual requirements and component properties of the actual implementation before making any statement.

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