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I saw this relatively cheap transceiver on amazon. So, I thought, for a beginner like me, why don't I buy it? I didn't want to buy the thousand-dollar icom transceiver, so I was left with that option. Well, that was a mistake, because technicians can't transmit phone on HF, I couldn't use it (except to listen) until I got my general. Now that I got my general, I found out it only puts out less than half a watt. By the time I got my general, the 30 day return window was already closed. On the description, it said it outputs much more than half a watt. I connected a analog wattmeter to the antenna, and the other end to the transceiver. Do any of you know how to get the transceiver to work properly? I knew I shouldn't have trusted china. Also, it doesn't receive properly, but it works fine here. I don't think it is because of the antenna I have, but it might be. It is a EFHW antenna from ARRL.

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    $\begingroup$ How did you use your wattmeter? The back panel in the product link you shared indicates it puts out 3-5 watts. $\endgroup$
    – webmarc
    Dec 27, 2023 at 16:50
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    $\begingroup$ FYI, technician class license in the US does have transmit capability on a segment of the 10 meter band. $\endgroup$
    – webmarc
    Dec 27, 2023 at 16:51
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    $\begingroup$ What have you done so far? $\endgroup$
    – webmarc
    Dec 27, 2023 at 16:52

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL5MnMi_IUU&t=200 suggests this device actually does significantly more than half a watt — suggesting that if you don't see that output power, it's more likely to be due to measurement error. It could also be a production defect, but these are relatively rare.

You don't write how exactly you measured that you're getting less than half a Watt, but I'll assume you did made a measurement with your cabling included, to see how much power you feed into your antennas:

In that case, try connecting your power meter directly to the device. Since HF wavelengths are large, slight mismatches on short amounts of cabling don't matter as much. If the power measured when doing a CW Tone there is still as low as when you included the full cabling, then you'd look into fixing the circuitry, but no earlier.

Fixing the circuitry: such devices come in troves, so chances are yours is not perfectly known by many people. However, there was an "uSDX" open source schematic, and this is probably but a proper packaging of that into a reasonable enclosure. Might be quite possible to understand, but since you're very likely the only one with exactly your model of device on their desk here, will require measurements, reworks on your end.

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