2
$\begingroup$

British repeaters seem to have a channel associated with them, something like RV53 in this repeater: https://ukrepeater.net/my_repeater.php?id=2817

What is that?

Are frequencies channelized in the UK? All repeaters on the same channel seem to have the same frequency: https://ukrepeater.net/my_channel.php?channel=RV53

The reason I'm asking is because I'm making a repeater database and I want to know what to do with that information.

$\endgroup$

3 Answers 3

4
$\begingroup$

Yes, UK repeater frequencies are channelized; while our licences don't require us to use specific channels, Ofcom (regulator) has delegated repeater co-ordination to the RSGB (equivalent of ARRL in the USA) Emerging Technology Coordination Committee.

The ETCC, in turn, is responsible for ensuring that repeaters don't interfere with each other, which involves considering propagation and thus likely signal strength of a repeater; the goal is to ensure that a "standard" setup like a handheld won't key up two repeaters at once when transmitting, won't interfere with someone trying to key up a different repeater, and won't hear two repeaters on the same frequency. To make this easier, they use a set of repeater channels to ensure that there's never a "half way" overlap - repeaters are either on the same channel, a neighbouring channel, or shouldn't apply to this application.

There's a full guide at https://ukrepeater.net/doc_files/GuidetoRepeaterandGatewayLicensing.pdf to getting a repeater licensed in the UK; it includes an explanation of how they use a propagation model to determine which frequencies they can assign to your repeater without interference with other repeaters.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Seems like it's pretty much for the convenience of the frequency coordinators and the repeater operators though, people just using the repeater use the same information they would anywhere :) $\endgroup$ Jul 13 at 22:34
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It is mostly for the convenience of frequency coordination now. Back in the day, it also helped radio design - you had one crystal per frequency you could use, so channels limited the number of crystals a manufacturer needed to make $\endgroup$ Jul 15 at 8:18
1
$\begingroup$

There are several informative apps for UK repeater frequencies. My most used is, Repeater book. It list's all repeater operator's. Including codes, frequencies & offsets etc. It can be tailored so the one's positioned nearest your location appear first. This app helped me much more than i can express here. As i was a total noob to the scene. And the learning curve felt insurmountable. This allowed me to take small steps to begin my journey into Ham radio.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thank you for your response Snowy and welcome to Ham Stack Exchange. I'm actually making a new app similar to that one called Repeater World: repeater.world. But when I'm importing the data from ukrepeaters.net, there's a "channel", which surprised me, so I was asking what that was about. $\endgroup$ Jul 21 at 20:42
0
$\begingroup$

RSGB provides a list of "channels": https://ukrepeater.net/channel_list.html

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ hi there. That’s just a list of channels from the website OP already linked to, and doesn’t really answer the question about the purpose of channels in the UK. Maybe you’d consider updating your answer to more directly answer the question. $\endgroup$
    – webmarc
    Jul 17 at 22:29

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .