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I'm looking for information regarding allowed occupied bandwidth and maximum symbol rate for the following amateur satellite bands

  1. Amateur VHF (144 to 148 MHz) aka 2m-band
  2. Amateur UHF (430 to 440 MHz) aka 70cm-band
  3. Amateur S-band (2400 to 2450 MHz) aka 13cm-band

This information is needed for certification of a transceiver operating in amateur VHF, UHF, and S-band. The idea is to have the transceiver conforming to the RF requirements for all ITU regions.

Regards,

Moses.

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    $\begingroup$ Under what jurisdiction? You might expect it to not matter because well, it's space, but international law is ... complicated. $\endgroup$ Sep 3 at 2:34
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    $\begingroup$ For ITU Regions 1, 2, and 3 (In case they is harmony in the countries within the same region) $\endgroup$ Sep 3 at 12:02
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    $\begingroup$ ITU regions 1, 2, and 3 is the entire world. Can you be more specific? ITU regions don't pass legislation, countries do. $\endgroup$ Sep 3 at 12:42
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    $\begingroup$ Please edit your question to give us more specifics, something that we can work with. Are you looking for the lowest common denominator because you have an idea for a new mode? If you're asking for a summary of the laws regarding amateur radio and satellites of all the countries in the world, that's much too broad of a question. We're volunteers, but few of us are legal librarians. $\endgroup$
    – rclocher3
    Sep 9 at 4:29
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    $\begingroup$ I'm sorry, but you're asking for too much information for one question, so I'm closing it. $\endgroup$
    – rclocher3
    Sep 13 at 20:10
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The maximum rates for the US are as follows:

Frequency Rate
2 Meters 19.6k
70 cm 56k
>902MHz. None

You can find a reference from the FCC, a copy of the relevant section here, and another question related to this here.

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    $\begingroup$ Sorry, I just realized I left off the bandwidth. It's documented in that same FCC reference. I'll update this with bandwidth tomorrow $\endgroup$
    – David Hoelzer
    Sep 3 at 0:20
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    $\begingroup$ Note that this applies for emitters within the US, I don't think it applies to anywhere else! $\endgroup$ Sep 3 at 16:08
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    $\begingroup$ Absolutely true, though I think they are close. Perhaps someone with specific knowledge could add an answer or edit this one? $\endgroup$
    – David Hoelzer
    Sep 3 at 16:59
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    $\begingroup$ Wish I was authorative, but in lieu of anyone else: I think the symbol rate limit .... let's call it creative approach to regulation .... is a FCC-only thing; that would leave the world free to simply operate satellites at arbitrary rates as long as the bandwidths allow. (India might also be special, as they, I think, require satellite services you contact from Indian ground to be operated based in India...) This gets complicated pretty quickly, and I'm afraid a comprehensive list for all jurisdictions on this planet would exceed the scope of an answer. $\endgroup$ Sep 3 at 17:10
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    $\begingroup$ I believe in ages past, FCC set the symbol rate to regulate bandwidth. Since then, we've come up with clever ways to get higher symbol rates in the same bandwidth (or narrower bandwidth for the same symbol rate), so the original regulation is now obsolete, but FCC has been hesitant to either add a bandwidth limit or fix the symbol rate, despite repeated requests. $\endgroup$
    – user10489
    Sep 3 at 22:45

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