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I have obtained permission by the Rocky Mountain Radio League to link my AllStar linking system node to their repeater via RF or on the input frequency.

Since they have such a long tail, they will stop the transmitting tone immediately so I can base the operation on the tone.

With a simplex link, I would just have the radio programmed to transmit and receive on two separate frequencies just like anyone else would link in to the repeater.

With full duplex, someone on the internet link could still talk even when the repeater is transmitting something (maybe an announcement etc.), but the disadvantage is that the remote link has too much control and trolls could come in and just double with everybody.

Should I go with a simplex link, or go with the extra efforts of another radio and some sort of filter (duplexer, diplexer, band reject, band pass, high pass, low pass don't know which one)

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I would go for the simplex option because there's no need to be able to TX at the same time as RXing if it's on a repeater.

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I currently transmit with an AllStar node to a repeater on 900 MHz using a 70 cm link radio with a DPL. Because I am on a link frequency, I use simplex. When the repeater is transmitting on the output frequency, it is also transmitting on the link frequency which reduces doubling. The repeater has three radios in it. One for local receive, local transmit, and simplex linking.

If someone is transmitting through AllStar, then my link radio is transmitting to the repeater. The repeater controller can determine which signal is the priority...the link channel input or the repeater channel input. What will the controller do if the link is active and a local user keys up? Two inputs are coming into the repeater. Is there a priority signal or first come first served?

If the remote link radio is transmitting, it won't hear someone transmitting locally through the repeater since the link radio cannot listen while it transmits. This is a good thing.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi Garrett, and welcome to ham.stackexchange.com! We recommend all new users take the tour to get the most from the site, and since you volunteered an answer, it couldn't hurt to also read how to answer. Cheers! $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Jan 8 '17 at 2:25

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