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Can a HUGE ham radio antenna on a house with an array of RING devices (5 in total) cause interference and high-frequency reverberation?

The attached shows one of these devices (there's 2 under the antenna) which is perhaps 3 feet away from the antenna. We've been hearing high-frequencies which seems to tie-out to installation of RING so I'm wondering if the signals are interfering with one another causing reverberation and the high-frequencies (we hear this 24/7 but intensity does vary during the day and night).

The antenna and device is perhaps 30 feet from our house and our bedroom window (where its the strongest). Can anyone weigh-in on this as we're losing our mind listening to these high-frequencies.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you please give us some details about these RING devices? $\endgroup$
    – Mike Waters
    Jun 21 at 0:04
  • $\begingroup$ What happens if you wrap the RING devices (whatever they are) in tinfoil? Preferrably all of them together. What happens if you pick them up and drive with them somewhere else? (shopping mall, countryside...) $\endgroup$ Jun 21 at 5:37
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    $\begingroup$ This needs more information for a productive answer. What are these "RING devices?" How do you know that's a ham radio antenna? It's hard to tell anything about it from a single low resolution photo. $\endgroup$ Jun 21 at 13:07
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    $\begingroup$ Ring LLC is a company owned by Amazon that makes networked security devices such as doorbell cameras and alarms. $\endgroup$
    – rclocher3
    Jun 21 at 14:42
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question because it's unanswerable as originally asked; in other words, it needs details or clarity. $\endgroup$
    – rclocher3
    Jun 22 at 15:08
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Ham radio and marine radio are separate unrelated services. Marine radio is used on boats, and this looks like a house, not a boat.

Both ham radio and marine radio transmit intermittently. If you are seeing something continuous and 24/7, then it can't be from either a ham service or a marine service. Variations in the intensity don't make a difference here. If it never stops, it has nothing to do with amateur radio or marine radio.

This does not address the RING devices, which could have a speaker, but that is off topic for amateur radio.

There is actually no reason to be sure the antenna is for either of these radio services. It could also be a CB antenna or a commercial public service radio antenna, although it is unlikely to be a commercial service antenna on a private residence.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the reply- although it is heard 24/7 there are periods where it is much more intense, for shorter periods of time. Yes, this is on his house but FCC license is Marine (I'm not too familiar with these radios so added in case it mattered). THese devices are fairly new and tie-out to the timeline we started hearing this. I'm also otherwise surrounded by woods on a very quiet road. Thanks again for weighing-in. $\endgroup$
    – Steve J
    Jun 20 at 13:33
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    $\begingroup$ How is an FCC license related to this, it wasn't mentioned in the question. Why do you think the FCC license is marine? $\endgroup$
    – user10489
    Jun 20 at 13:37
  • $\begingroup$ Just trying to give complete background knowing nothing about ham antennas, of, if there's a difference between marine and others. $\endgroup$
    – Steve J
    Jun 20 at 14:09
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    $\begingroup$ Assuming it has anything to do with marine radio is a very poor guess. Assuming the sound is related to radio is also a poor guess. Claiming it is marine or has an fcc license without actually seeing the license is an even worse assumption, with possible legal repercussions -- you should not make this accusation. $\endgroup$
    – user10489
    Jun 20 at 19:41
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No. It's not possible for RF to make things reverberate at a high frequency; at least not without making your brain boil.

Your photo is not high enough resolution to see anything. Literally. Also...it's not Marine HAM; the two are not mutual and HAM is not an acronym and should not be capitalized.

You might want to purchase an ultrasonic detector and find out if they are coming from his house or if it's something coincidental. If you go and just start accusing your neighbor; he will likely get very upset. The issue is the first time anything happens, people automatically blame the ham radio guy, grab the pitchforks, and start tearing his stuff down. Try talking to him kindly...but only after you determine the problem is actually coming from his property.

But I don't think it's going to be directly related to any of the "devices" he's supposedly installed.

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  • $\begingroup$ I worked with top technologists for over 35 years so I'm not technically deficient- just unfamiliar with ham and associated antennas. This is the only thing new in the area and it's been going on for months. Sensors are unable to detect the hf sound (I've tried a variety of them and reached out to professors and sensor manufacturers- all have told me it's near impossible). I reverted to basic physics and sound- waves travel 5X faster in water and exponentially faster in solids (water ripples in sealed battle of water-only happens here (main to house off). Your comment was condescending. $\endgroup$
    – Steve J
    Jun 20 at 14:06
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    $\begingroup$ You basically answered your question, You have it 24/7, amature radio operators need to eat and sleep like the rest of us. I am very comfortable stating he is not on the air 24/7 with a continuous transmission. You may have a problem with the Ring devices interfering with each other causing the problem. Turn the rings off and see if the problem goes away? From your picture it could be a CB antenna, it is not very clear. $\endgroup$
    – Gil
    Jun 20 at 21:37
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    $\begingroup$ Hello Jay, and welcome to ham.stackexchange.com! $\endgroup$
    – rclocher3
    Jun 22 at 15:05
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You are saying the noise is constant. Ham radio does not broadcast constantly with the possible exception of a beacon which by definition is low power.

You might want to politely ask your neighbor if they can assist you in tracking down the cause of the interference. Most Ham operators have experience in tracking down and remedying sources of electronic noise. Most are glad to demonstrate their knowledge.

There is also a chance that this is not a ham radio antenna, it could be CB or some other radio service.

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    $\begingroup$ I’ll add that most often it’s the hams who are victims of harmful interference from their neighbors, not the other way around. $\endgroup$ Jun 21 at 19:37

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