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KK4UOT... I'm moving from Nashville, to Barcelona area Spain. My current license is for a technician, which I know is not enough to obtain an EU transmit operators, but I am curious, if I upgrade my license in the USA before completing my move, can it transfer? I am fully ready to take and almost surely pass the General license, but I would need to get it together/study for the Extra license.

Or, perhaps it is simpler to start over in Europe? If I need to start all over in Europe, is the process ONLY 1 level of certification? (Specifically Spain) I am not sure of the local community as my HF radio is in the states, I can only see handheld/repeater/dmr traffic. As of now, I remain silent in Europe.

Any advice from anyone who has been through this would be most welcome! Thanks!

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  • $\begingroup$ Adding as comment since this is not an answer, but looks like HAREC won't help you at least. See more info here: arrl.org/reciprocal-permit-faqs $\endgroup$ – Thomas Apr 12 at 13:21
  • $\begingroup$ Hello and welcome to ham.stackexchange.com! $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Apr 12 at 17:33
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An operator who holds an Amateur Extra license from the US is allowed to operate from Spain as a visitor via CEPT reciprocity, but CEPT T/R 61-01 and the Spanish regulation both make it clear that you lose that right once you become a resident of Spain, and you will need a Spanish license.

You might be able to petition SETSI for a temporary license valid for up to 90 days if you had your Extra (Article 15; it says it's for visiting foreigners from non-CEPT countries, but the way I'm reading things, it seems like they have some discretion, which is why I'm saying you might get lucky), but in any case you would have to pass the Spanish test to be able to continue operating. Your US license doesn't provide any advantage or shortcut.

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  • $\begingroup$ Many thanks for a great post. I am curious as to how that my apply to a DMR-based solution that does not use HF etc., but by using the internet to communicate to DMR stations in the states. $\endgroup$ – KK4UOT Apr 16 at 6:44
  • $\begingroup$ I am not a dual citizen, I am not giving up my citizenship, or obtaining Spanish citizenship, I am a "highly qualified worker", and have the EU equivalent of a "Green Card" (H1B) visa in order to live here legally, but I am not a citizen, which I guess was my main ambiguity. I looked into the laws, but they seemed more applicable to citizens than residents. I guess that was my gray area... How much is a "visitor" lol. Thanks again for a good reply. $\endgroup$ – KK4UOT Apr 16 at 6:57
  • $\begingroup$ @KK4UOT citizenship doesn't matter, residence does. Spanish law determines when you become a resident, but it can start as soon as whenever you arrive there with an intention of living there and not going home somewhere else... and if not, probably starts when you get a permanent resident card. But don't ask me, immigration law is not my thing. $\endgroup$ – hobbs - KC2G Apr 19 at 21:54

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