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enter image description here

Hello, what kind of antenna is this? I’ve been trying to figure it out for 14 years. None of my neighbors know. Whomever installed it either moved or passed away.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Teresa, and welcome to ham.stackexchange.com! $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Oct 19 at 13:36
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    $\begingroup$ If you were able to sight along the horizontal part of the antenna, you might see that it points toward another antenna somewhere else, which the antenna in the picture communicates with. Knowing where the other antenna is might help you figure out what the antennas are for. $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Oct 19 at 15:43
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    $\begingroup$ If it's on your property then you could probably just cut it down, but if it were on mine, then I'd want to know what the antenna cable is connected to first. $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Oct 19 at 16:48
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    $\begingroup$ Is it your antenna to remove? Is it on your property and, if so, where does the antenna cable run to? Or is it located on some shared part of your development, such as a roadway? $\endgroup$ – Graham Nye Oct 19 at 23:12
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    $\begingroup$ The pole/antenna is on an access easement/driveway that I share with two other neighbors. They are new and have no idea what the antenna is. The old neighbors, going back for about 15 plus years also had no idea. $\endgroup$ – Teresa Oct 20 at 14:32
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The antenna is a Yagi-Uda, or Yagi, antenna. It is a highly directional type of antenna (and this one has 4 director elements, making it particularly so). Yagi antennas are recognizable by the structure of having a series of parallel elements (rods) of slightly varying length, with the feed line (wiring) running to the element adjacent to the rear "reflector" element (the longest element).

A directional antenna with a fixed (not rotatable) mount is only useful for point-to-point communications; in other words, it's pointing at a specific other station with its own antenna (which may or may not be directional). Possible uses for this include:

  • Point-to-point wireless networking (either to provide Internet access, or as a dedicated link between two buildings). However, this antenna looks a little lower in frequency range than I'd expect for that application.
  • Voice communication (which could be amateur, public service, or commercial); talking to a repeater that is also used by handheld/mobile radios. The directional antenna and fixed radio installation is used to cover a longer distance, or be more reliable, than otherwise.
  • Telemetry from remote stations (unlikely in an urban area).
  • …and probably other uses I'm not familiar with.

Another common use of directional antennas mounted on poles is for television reception, but television antennas are generally horizontally polarized (the rods would be horizontal rather than vertical) and closer to the log-periodic design than Yagi-Uda (because they need to be able to receive many different stations and thus need a wider frequency range).

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    $\begingroup$ Some people in the rural area where I live use similar Yagi-Uda antennas for communication between a well pump and a building served by the well pump but fairly distant from it (a few hundred meters maximum). The communications link serves to turn the well pump on and off. $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Oct 19 at 15:38
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. How do I remove this antenna? $\endgroup$ – Teresa Oct 19 at 16:26
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    $\begingroup$ @Teresa That is a very different question, which you should post separately (as a new question, not a comment). When you do, make sure to include pictures of the bottom of the mast, where it goes into the ground (or attaches to some other structure). $\endgroup$ – Kevin Reid AG6YO Oct 19 at 16:47
  • $\begingroup$ @Teresa Kevin has spoken well. Without pictures of the bottom, we really can't help you with that. Quick link to Ask a new Question $\endgroup$ – Mike Waters Oct 19 at 18:03

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