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What tools can I use to study for the entry-level ham test? Are the ham tests online now?

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assuming you're in the USA, I've found HamStudy to be very well done AND is free. Check out "study mode" first, where you're presented with actual questions on the exam as well as information about why the correct answer is correct.

And there are plenty of other resources out there that provide similar info.

When you're ready to take the exam, you can find online test sessions in addition to in-person sessions... again these links assume you are in the USA.

Even if you're not in the USA, you can use HamStudy to get familiar with concepts that are relevant to radio and operating and you can skip the portions that relate specifically to USA law & regulation in favor of your country's regulating body.

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This answer is specific to the US. By the way, Morse code testing was dropped from all amateur radio license exams in the US back in 2007.

In the past the FCC conducted amateur licensing exams, but these days the tests have been delegated to volunteer examiners (VEs). Volunteer examiners are typically ordinary hams who have volunteered to give licensing exams. Volunteer examiners are organized by Volunteer Examiner Coordinators (VECs), which are organizations that serve as a liaison between the exam applicants and the FCC. VECs have to be certified by the FCC, and VEs must agree to abide by the rules set by the FCC and their VEC. There is a complete list of VECs here. Two notable VECs are the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), which is the national organization of amateur radio operators in the US, and the W5YI Group. Both the ARRL and the W5YI Group have web pages to look up future license exams near you, here and here.

Apparently both the ARRL and the W5YI Group offer remote video conference exam sessions. For more information search for a license exam near you, and then contact the listed examiner.

Many resources are available to study for the exams. Licensing classes are a popular option. Both the ARRL and the W5YI Group offer license classes, and offer web pages here and here to search for upcoming classes near you.

Both the ARRL and the W5YI Group sell books to learn about amateur radio and study for the exam. The ARRL books tend to be more centered on theory, and the W5YI books tend to be more focused on teaching just what you need to know to pass the exam. Most license classes teach from a book from one organization or the other.

A good resource for people studying for license exams are online practice exams. The question pools for the exams have been published, so the online practice exams typically use the same questions as the actual exams. There are many different practice exams, which are easily found with a web search. I seem to remember that the online practice exams on qrz.com are particularly good, because you get instant feedback as soon as you click an answer. The online practice exams are valuable for study purposes, and if you can consistently pass practice exams, then you will probably pass a real exam.

Please allow me to offer some advice that is not directly related to the question. Many people who were interested in amateur radio, passed the exam, and became licensed end up quickly losing interest, sometimes without ever making contacts on the air. I think this is tragic because it's a waste of time for the people who lost interest, and because it weakens the hobby. Often the people who lose interest became interested for emergency preparedness reasons. I would urge anyone who goes to the trouble of getting an amateur radio license to follow through by meeting a few local hams and making contacts regularly. Joining the local ham radio club is a good way to meet local hams and get more out of amateur radio. The ARRL has a club locator web page here. Checking into a weekly net on a local repeater or on HF is an easy way to regularly make contacts; weekly nets are usually sponsored by a club, but typically club membership is not required to participate in the net.

Ham radio is very valuable as an emergency resource. To communicate by radio in an emergency one needs a radio with a charged battery or other source of emergency power, a list of emergency frequencies (which should already be programmed into the radio for VHF/UHF), and the knowledge of how to use the radio effectively to ask for help or to help others. The best way to ensure that you have a working radio, the skills, and the knowledge to communicate effectively in an unexpected emergency is to make contacts regularly. Ten or fifteen minutes a week would probably be enough.

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