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I am thinking about putting up a 70cm repeater up on my High School, where they have a very tall roof.

By the time It is ready to put it up, I want to make sure a frequency is reserved for the repeater.

Who do I contact / where can I get a frequency coordinated for the repeater?

I am located in Denver, Colorado, USA.

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I see you're from the United States based on your call sign, so let me answer the question for the US first, and then let me give a few indicators as to how you might do this across the world. In the United States, repeater frequencies are coordinated by a body known as the National Frequency Coordination Council. Visiting their web site, you can find a frequency coordinator for your given state. Talk to the frequency coordinator, and make sure you are operating on the correct frequency.

As for outside of the United States, you need to either consult your government, or look for a similar frequency coordination council.

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  • $\begingroup$ While this is the correct answer, please be aware that - in some areas - getting a frequency pair is more about who you know than any particular need or interest. There are many frequencies here in the eastern Great Lakes area marked as allocated which haven't seen a live repeater for years. $\endgroup$ – scruss May 21 '14 at 11:48
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Contact the CCARC.net folks - they run the repeater coordination here in Colorado. That said, my understanding is that there are no available allocations in either the 2m or 440 bands, except for some room for digital (MotoTRBO or DSTAR) modes. That said, reach out to them, their web page lists http://www.ccarc.net/wordpress/coordination-support/ as the place to go to request a coordination.

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First of all, I am a Ham Radio Operator of 25 years. PER THE FEDERAL LAW covering amateur radio, PART 97, (get a copy and read it) There is NO law that says You can't set up a repeater unless it is coordinated by a local council or anyone else. You look on your frequency allocation chart from the FCC and you look at the frequencies that the FCC says you can use for repeaters. Make sure you listen to that pair of frequencies for at least 30 days and make sure nobody comes along and tries to use it. You can even do this with two frequencies from a repeater that nobody has been heard using for 30 days. The law does not even have to say you have to do these last two things but it would be a good idea. But no Ham Radio Operator can ever have any kind of ownership of any frequency. As long as you are not intentionally interfering with another ham while he or she is talking, A Ham radio operator has a right to talk on any Ham radio freq anywhere with a set aside use for voice usage by the FCC.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello, and welcome to ham.stackexchange.com. Please know that this site has a different format from a typical chat-style forum. Our goal is to collect questions and their answers, and sort out the best answers. Please take the tour to get the idea. You might be technically correct that Part 97 doesn't require coordination, but your post doesn't answer the question, which was about how to request a coordinated frequency pair. We're glad you're here and we'll look forward to more from you, but please respect the goal of this site. 73! $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Feb 12 '17 at 19:12

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