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Here's why I wonder about this: I would love to be able to reach an Echolink-enabled repeater or similar, but I live on the other side of a ridge that would probably block a transmission to the nearest one. BUT I can likely reach a different repeater that would probably reach to the Echolink-enabled repeater.

I know very little about ham radio so far. Hope to get my license and get on the air sometime.

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    $\begingroup$ Why do you want to reach the Echolink enabled repeater? Perhaps there is an alternative approach to what you are trying to accomplish. $\endgroup$ – WA9ZZZ Apr 24 at 13:51
  • $\begingroup$ @WA9ZZZ I live in Alaska and there is only one Echolink repeater that I could use, but it on the other side of a ridge. I am curious because being able to access an Echolink repeater would mean more people to talk to. If there is an alternative I would gladly like to find out. $\endgroup$ – The Blender Bender Apr 25 at 3:56
  • $\begingroup$ Once you get your license you can register with the Echolink system and use your computer to access many Echolink enabled repeaters. Depending on the preferences of the sponsoring club, access to some repeaters is limited to members for incoming connections and they may discourage random outgoing connections. Also, the Fairbanks area has a couple of Yaesu C4FM System Fusion repeaters which may be Internet connected. $\endgroup$ – WA9ZZZ Apr 25 at 15:22
  • $\begingroup$ Have a look at this related question: Is there a trick for reaching a repeater “through” terrain? $\endgroup$ – rclocher3 Apr 27 at 14:54
  • $\begingroup$ Have you considered using a passive repeater? $\endgroup$ – Ben Madison Apr 28 at 19:50
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A repeater simply listens on one frequency, and retransmits what it receives on another frequency. If one repeater happened to listen on the frequency another was transmitting, theoretically you could exploit this to extend your range in one direction at least.

Unfortunately as a user you have no control over these frequencies. To avoid interference with each other, repeater operators usually coordinate to not use the same frequencies. Some jurisdictions legally require this coordination.

It is possible to link repeaters through the internet (this is how Echolink works) or though a point-to-point microwave link. Some clubs operate networks of repeaters in this way. They may be linked all the time or require some user command to bring up the link. This however does require deliberate setup on the part of the repeater owner.

So unless the owner(s) of the repeaters in question have cooperated to link the repeaters though some means, unfortunately you can not use one repeater to hit another. Your best bet is to find the owner of the repeaters you can hit, see if they have any documentation on what links they provide, and if no such documentation exists contact them and inquire.

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They often do set them up to link to various repeaters. PRA for example. If those repeaters are linked it may work. If not it would not. Are you in contact with the repeater owner?

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  • $\begingroup$ I do not, but I appreciate the answer. $\endgroup$ – The Blender Bender Apr 25 at 3:59
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A licensed radio amateur, who is a validated user of Echolink and has an access problem similar to yours, would have absolutely no problem working through that repeater, via the internet, using Echolink. The question of accessing that repeater through another one does not arise, since Echolink would provide that very access for which it is intended.

Radio amateurs, who have no access to a local repeater or even a transceiver, easily work through repeaters on the other side of the world using Echolink.

The answer to your title question is no. The repeater-pair frequencies, assigned in band plans, would ensure that that would not be possible and thereby prevent unwanted interference.

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