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How are the conductors/radiators in the E-Z-O Antenna configured, and why is it described in Wikipedia's article Quad antenna?

I see three circles and a spider web of wires inside each, but from an electrical point of view I can't understand what's going on, and the article doesn't help.

How is this a type of quad antenna?

below: Cropped, contrast enhanced, monochromed for better visualization of the wires. Original source.

enter image description here

below: Original image click image for full size or visit link.

enter image description here

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It's basically 3 square/cubical quad elements bent into a circle. Though not really a "quad" because it doesn't have four sides, in principle it is electrically similar.

There is a boom and three circular metal elements: director, driven element, and reflector. Everything else you see are guy and support ropes.

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  • $\begingroup$ Oh! I see what you mean now. I wonder if it is a multi-band as well? i.stack.imgur.com/EY0Jk.jpg Thanks! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 27 at 1:33
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    $\begingroup$ Doesn't look it to me. The red arrows are pointing at one of the non-conductive guys. The inventor claims "slighty" higher gain than a cubical quad. How the gain and pattern compares with a quad would have to be determined by modeling. $\endgroup$ – Mike Waters Feb 27 at 1:35
  • $\begingroup$ I meant the read arrows to indicate the direction of current flow in the polygonal loops. I see four loops of different sizes. The Wikipedia article says that the largest loop is dielectric and probably structural. I don't see how these loops could add any structural benefit. wait: maybe I am confused. You think that only the three outside circular loops are the electrical elements and the whole spider web (radial plus polygons) are all structural/support? $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 27 at 1:39
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    $\begingroup$ That's what I'm saying. He has conductors inside insulating tubes. All that would do is affect the electrical length of the conductors. $\endgroup$ – Mike Waters Feb 27 at 1:45
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It's described on the Wikipedia page because the creator of the antenna put it there in Feb 2009.

The E-Z-O section has subsequently been removed and re-added several times.

  • Jan 2014, it was removed by an anonymous user with the explanation: "False claim to fame because the EZO variation is nothing but a variation on a coaxial loop antenna with reflector and directors"
  • Jun 2018 The section as restored by a user Enix150 without any explanation.
  • Feb 27, 2019 (shortly after you posted this question) The section is removed again by an anonymous user.

http://www.ezoantennas.com/ claims:

In spite of its humble inception, this could be the biggest improvement in antenna design in over 50 years!

The site appears to be authored by N8PPQ, and the domain registration and FCC database corroborate the authenticity of the author.

A circular versus square element is only minorly significant, electrically. Most of the visible lines are nonconductive support structure, allowing the elements themselves to be flexible. ezoantennas.com explains:

The idea came after a Scouting event, and was inspired by the way tent design has changed, with flexible tubes replacing ridged [sic] poles.

This is an interesting idea in construction technique, but not as revolutionary as the author claims. I don't believe the antenna is unique enough to merit inclusion in Wikipedia.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, this is very helpful. Because of the way the Wikipedia article was written I'd assumed there was something really profound going on that was over my head, something hidden in all those lines. I appreciate your clarifications. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Feb 27 at 23:39

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