2
$\begingroup$

I'd like to perform some simple receiver testing and calibration (mostly for frequency variance, not signal strength) and have been told WWV/WWVH transmissions can be found throughout most of the US.

What would be a good, cheap, small antenna for receiving one or more of these transmissions at 2.5MHz, 5MHz, 10MHz, 15MHz, and 20MHz? I note that it's common for "atomic" clocks to have such an antenna internal, and if I find one lying about I'll use it, but I don't keep such clocks, nevermind random ferrite rods, lying about.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of Is there a simple, diy, antenna suitable of HF receive only? $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Jan 10 '14 at 21:32
  • $\begingroup$ That question doesn't really approach the request for small antenna design that this one asks for. $\endgroup$ – Adam Davis Jan 11 '14 at 4:54
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ How is it different? An antenna for WWV isn't different than any other HF antenna for a similar frequency. This question is also unanswerable. The "smallest" antenna might be a 1mm long wire. In some locations (right next to the transmitter), this is entirely sufficient to receive the signal. But, that's probably not what you had in mind. $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Jan 12 '14 at 15:17
  • $\begingroup$ I'm going to assume you are in the USA. Here in Australia, the signals are somewhat harder to catch (I believe they come from Hawaii). What works for you in size & simplicity probably won't work for me. Considering that, take any advice you get with a grain of salt until it's assembled, connected and verified by your own eyes & ears. $\endgroup$ – Alan Campbell Oct 31 '14 at 5:40
  • $\begingroup$ Note that atomic clocks typically receive signals from WWVB which, while broadcast from essentially the same site as WWV, is a rather different signal: the rods in those radios would be tuned to 60kHz, yes kilohertz! $\endgroup$ – natevw - AF7TB Apr 13 '16 at 23:08
3
$\begingroup$

Depends on your receiver sensitivity and antenna location. I've seen some many-decades-old portable shortwave radios pick up at least one WWV frequency using their simple built-in half-meter to meter long metal whip antenna.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

An end-fed http://www.aa5tb.com/efha.html tuned for 2.5MHz will also serve well at the higher frequencies you seek.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Why is an end-fed antenna more suited to this application than any other? $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Jan 13 '14 at 13:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.