Recently, I asked a question about using an Arduino to send packet radio. I noticed that the top record speed for packet radio is 1 megabit/second, on a modified radio. Someone mention on stack overflow that the normal speed is around 120 kilobits/second! So is there an alternative to packet radio for sending digital bits over ham?

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    @MikeWaters and the laws OP is under – so, this boils down to national law. – Marcus Müller Jul 10 at 19:55
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    @MikeWaters That highly depends on country. Here in Canada, the data rate isn't defined; you can use the allowed frequency bandwidth any way you wish. There will be practical data rate limits based on that bandwidth allowance, but there is not an absolute declared maximum as, for example, the US imposes. – Jim MacKenzie VE5EV Jul 10 at 22:38
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    @MarcusMüller Yes, I wanted to know an alternative to packet radio that is faster. If it was slower and had no other benefits, it would be useless. – itisyeetimetoday Jul 11 at 0:59
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    but: all these are made for a specific purpose. Can you elaborate on what you want to do in the end? What kind of data, to which end, do you want to transmit. – Marcus Müller Jul 11 at 7:12
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    @JimMacKenzieVE5EV you're not being pedantic, I just gave an incorrect definition :) – Marcus Müller Jul 11 at 14:39

In absence of a clear indication of what Amateur Radio band is being targeted here, an answer for the 13 cm band:

You can use 802.11g/OFDM with a 20MHz bandwidth on 2400-2450 MHz Amateur band. You could even modify existing/consumer Wifi equipment to do so.

This would give you a (theoretical) 54 Mbits/sec throughput.

Obviously you need to check that you are licensed to do so, and I would advise you to check the bandplans as well.

There are 3 regions with different bandplans, here

From the 3 regions only Region-2 details the following footnote:

Broadband applications can be used in 2410 – 2450 MHz with the maximum CW of 22 MHz. The broadband applications should not cause interference on satellites communications

*) I believe the bandplan contains a typo. I seriously believe that where "CW" is mentioned in this footnote, it should read "BW" indicating Bandwidth.

Region-1 bandplan does not list such footnote, and Region-3 does not list anything above 1300 MHz. If you are located in those regions I would advise to consult with your regulatory body.

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