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In some countries, Ham licensing is still cumbersome even for citizens, and operation prohibited by foreigners.

I'm curious what the situation is like in Taiwan now. Years ago, there was little difference between the license and licensing process for a Ham station and that for a large commercial radio station. Also bringing equipment into the country yourself was prohibited and subject to on-the-spot confiscation. I think things have improved now, but I don't know to what extent.

These days, what are the rules regarding non-citizens operating licensed stations in Taiwan, does a citizen need to be present? Is self-importing of one's personal equipment still prohibited?

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See the Chinese Taipei Amateur Radio League (CTARL) web site for a link to information for Visitors and short-term residents of Taiwan wishing to operate an Amateur Radio station in Taiwan.

"Visitors and short-term residents of Taiwan wishing to operate an Amateur Radio station in Taiwan may apply for a Temporary Operating Permit after being sponsored by a licensed Taiwan host whose station they may operate during the period in which the issued permit is valid. Amateur Radio station licenses in Taiwan license the specific transmitting and radiating equipment operated, and the temporary permit is an operator permit only, so no transmitting equipment may be legally brought into Taiwan by visiting Amateur Radio operators."

CTARL officers are identified at Headquarters and Branche Offices. I recommend you reach out to the entire HQ staff as well as the branch representative for the region you plan to visit.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, your 2nd link appears to be dated October 2009. 2009-10/VSTR-op.htm and I'm pretty sure there have been some significant changes over the last decade. "I'm curious what the situation is like in Taiwan now. Years ago, there was little difference between the license and licensing process for a Ham station and that for a large commercial radio station." Luckily the last link is from 2015 so it's likely to be helpful. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Sep 14 '18 at 8:00
  • $\begingroup$ Please, enlighten us with a link to the changes you cite and update us when you learn the current status. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Brian K1LI Sep 14 '18 at 10:37
  • $\begingroup$ It's 2nd hand information I received from people in Taiwan years ago. I also remember reading blog posts written by expat Hams living in TW years ago as well. I was just curious if there is an up-to-date source of information in English, so far I haven't found one. I do know that FaceBook is very popular in TW; it's possible that there is a CTARL FB page that's actively maintained. I don't use social media (unless you count SE) so I wouldn't know how to check. $\endgroup$ – uhoh Sep 14 '18 at 10:49
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Over the last few years, there have been many changes in Amateur Radio licensing law and practice in Taiwan. One of the major changes is the abolition of the Morse Code proficiency requirement in order to obtain a Second-Class (rough FCC General equivalence) operator license. Another is using FCC pool questions in all relevant sections down to the wording and answer choices literally translated. Not sure whether the questions will be updated when then FCC pool for the license classes are updated.

One may bring in amateur radio equipment provided that accompanying paperwork is completed and is not allowed to be operated until it is inspected and approved at the NCC (National Communications Commission) office. It may not matter anyway to a foreign guest operator, because they cannot use their own equipment.

What has not changed is that Taiwan (including Kinmen, Matsu and Penghu outlying islands) does not share operating authority with any other jurisdiction, period.

Operators licensed in their home jurisdiction may apply for temporary operating authority at a local sponsor station: http://www.ctarl.org.tw/bv5ya/2009-10/VSTR-op.htm

While the link is dated 2009-10, my understanding is that the link is current as of this posting. A list of guest operator permit grants may be found here: http://www.ctarl.org.tw/bv5ya/outnews.htm

What has also not changed is that one must possess a valid Alien Residence Certificate (ARC) or Passport issued by the Republic of China (Taiwan) to apply for an Amateur Radio Operator License and sit for the exam.

The CTARL face book page is limited to news feed of their activities. Current general information remains on their web site. Actually all the information is there, it just may not be presented in the manner you expect.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yep, it helps, thanks! $\endgroup$ – uhoh Nov 5 '19 at 20:19

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