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I couldn’t find a better place to ask this question, so I have asked it here.

I am looking to transmit and receive internet connectivity wirelessly over a distance of 6 miles (9.7 km) with a minimum 300Mb transfer rate. This is not exclusive to amateur radio frequencies but is exclusive to publicly available frequencies (to buy or access openly).

I am seeking to transmit internet connectivity from an area that has DSL which I need to an area that has only satellite access available, which does not fit my needs.

Note: I am in the US so FCC rules apply.

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    $\begingroup$ Would you share the end goal of the project? Whats it actually doing, might help get better answers $\endgroup$ – Chad G Apr 20 '18 at 22:47
  • $\begingroup$ @ChadG I have edited the question for clarification $\endgroup$ – user11905 Apr 21 '18 at 0:03
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All kinds of digital microwave technologies can do this, including WiFi. It takes a good antenna location high from the ground, and good antenna gain / transmit power. Commercial wireless ISPs do it regularly. With a good antenna and cooperative terrain (no hills in the way), it could be done with consumer 802.11 equipment.

Mind the link budget, and the radio horizon. For example, see How to test Line-of-Sight radio at 5GHz at range 25Km or less?

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  • $\begingroup$ I have done this with consumer WiFi equipment (with external antenna options) and directional antenna's. Sucsesfully, stable. Over a distance of 4 km. I do not see any limitations, however practice has shown that throughput speeds may vary with variable weather conditions. E.g. heave rain downpour will affect bandwidth and speed. $\endgroup$ – Edwin van Mierlo Apr 18 '18 at 14:36
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    $\begingroup$ Take care when adding antenna gain - there are often regulatory limitations if you wish to be legal in your operation. For example, in the US on the 2.4 GHz band, with one watt of output you are limited to 6 dBi of antenna gain for an EIRP of 4 watts (36 dBm). You can, however, have use a much higher gain antenna if you reduce your transmitter power. This combination results in a much greater allowed EIRP than with a one watt transmitter - 158 watts EIRP (52 dBm). On the 5.8 GHz band, the FCC generally restricts EIRP to 4 watts or less but there are lots of caveats for this spectrum segment. $\endgroup$ – Glenn W9IQ Apr 18 '18 at 14:55
  • $\begingroup$ @GlennW9IQ Good point, though I believe that 2.4 GHz limit only applies to unlicensed operation. $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Apr 18 '18 at 15:27
  • $\begingroup$ We don't know that this poster is in the US, so shouldn't make any assumptions that FCC rules apply yet. $\endgroup$ – Jim MacKenzie VE5EV Apr 21 '18 at 13:23
  • $\begingroup$ @EdwinvanMierlo I am trying to find a method that is reliable and fast without the cost of running hardwire a whole ~6 Miles and no ISP will service my area but 6 Miles rien the road they will $\endgroup$ – user11905 Apr 22 '18 at 22:35
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To support that type of bandwidth you will generally be using microwave (> 2 GHz) or higher frequencies. Reliable communications will be limited to line of sight situations.

This type of application is well beyond the homebrew capabilities of most hobbyists. The good news is commercial world has a wide range of cost effective products available for these types of applications. The frequencies, power levels, antenna gains, and licensing requirements are generally country specific. To get started, you may wish to look at a company like Ubiquity. There are many such companies on the market and most offer excellent guides for properly and legally deploying their products.

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    $\begingroup$ I wouldn't say "well beyond". A salvaged satellite dish would be sufficient, I bet. $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Apr 18 '18 at 13:03
  • $\begingroup$ 6 miles, 15i dB antennas on each end, on 2.4 GHz yields a FSPL of 90 dB. With a 30 dBm transmitter that yields -60 dBm at the receiver: that's a working WiFi link. Maybe marginal at the 300 Mbs goal, but not "well beyond". $\endgroup$ – Phil Frost - W8II Apr 18 '18 at 13:08
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    $\begingroup$ I believe there are commercial solutions with greater than 1 watt transmitters but this goes to the issue of applicable regulations. $\endgroup$ – Glenn W9IQ Apr 18 '18 at 14:02

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