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I am taking the test for my first USA Amateur Technicians license on Saturday.

I've been studying and give myself a good (90%) chance that I'll pass the test.

Since many of you have successfully gone through this testing regime, what are some best practices based on your experience and essential knowledge to pass?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Kevin Reid AG6YO Apr 17 '18 at 18:02

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ "Some tips" isn't a good fit here. You could ask about a specific type of question that you are concerned you will do poorly with; that would help narrow it down. $\endgroup$ – Kevin Reid AG6YO Apr 17 '18 at 18:03
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    $\begingroup$ I'm noticing a lot of editing to try to improve the question by tweaking the wording, but it isn't getting to the actual problem. The question used to say "some tips" and now it says "some best practices based on your experience"; but in order to be a good question it needs to ask for one specific thing, not some unspecified things. A good question can potentially have an answer that is obviously the best answer; a question that asks for people's experiences inherently has many answers. $\endgroup$ – Kevin Reid AG6YO Apr 19 '18 at 1:57
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Somewhat tongue-in-cheek - Where's the 90% coming from - are you taking practice exams and, if so, answering 90% of the questions correctly, or are you answering correctly the minimum required 75% of questions only 90% of the time?

  1. Of course keep studying - ID the problem questions and develop some schemes to remember the correct answers. Note the answer choices are always in the same order (A,B,C,D) - not that I recommend rote memorization!
  2. Get there early. Bring the recommended pencils, IDs etc. Don't start the test under time pressure.
  3. Be sure to answer all questions - realize that the "all of the above" and similar answers are very often NOT the right answers (unlike many typical multiple choice tests).

Good luck!

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Keep writing practice tests and reading the course material. The more familiar you are with everything, the better your odds are.

Get a good night's sleep before the exam, so that you're not tired.

Relax - if you fail, you can try again before too long.

Good luck!

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