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Lets say that I get my amateur radio license in country A and then some time later I move to country B. Will I need to get a new license on country B or does the license obtained in country A works just fine?

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    $\begingroup$ Why the close and downvote whithout any comment? $\endgroup$ – kR105 Oct 22 '13 at 19:50
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    $\begingroup$ I think the close vote is because the total number of possible answers, even at any one given point in time, is approximately the square of the number of countries in the world. That's a pretty hefty number. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Oct 22 '13 at 19:52
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    $\begingroup$ Since no one else explained the close, I will. This is an extremely broad question that cannot be suitably answered in this format. There are a number of considerations, and any country that isn't in one of the reciprocity agreements really needs its own answer because the processes are unique in many different countries. $\endgroup$ – Dan KD2EE Oct 23 '13 at 11:49
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It very much depends on the two countries. In general, there are two large international groups with which operating within the same group is fairly easy. However, even for these two, if you move to another country you should get a license for that country. The two groups are (From ARRL):

  • CEPT- Primarily European countries
  • IARU- Primarily the Americas.
  • Many countries have direct reciprocal laws, check the laws for your country, or the new country.

Typically, a person making these calls will add in the country code where they are, followed by a / and their call. For instance, XE3/K5ENS is one from my log that did this, he was operating from Mexico region 3, with his US call sign of K5ENS.

Check with the rules of your country, or your Amateur Radio Union (ARRL for US, others have different groups) for more assistance. Bottom line is, get a license if you plan to stay there for a while, otherwise just use the temporary call.

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Unfortunately, the best answer I can give you is "it depends". Whether you can use a license issued in one country in another country depends on whether those countries have signed a treaty allowing such use. The ARRL has some information, mainly useful to US amateurs, on their site. If you'd like help Googling for specific country pairs, you can use the terms "reciprocal license" or "reciprocal privileges".

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A CEPT license is valid in all CEPT signatory countries, and many such countries will take it as proof of having passed the relevant examinations and issue a local corresponding license on request.

The CEPT license is meant for when you visit another country, however, so in and of itself probably won't be as good as a local license. A local license will come with its own local call sign and be issued by the relevant local authority.

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No. Amateur Radio license works only in the country where it is granted. However, certain countries have reciprocation agreements under which licensed operators from one country may operate in another country as long as they follow the regulations laid down in that country.

While operating in a foreign country, the operator must identify him/erself as such with a suffix see this. KE5ABC in India shall be KE5ABC/VU2

Also, this privilege may be revoked at any time by the host country - like times of war.

Some countries require a registration (some paperwork) before starting operations. So you cannot just walk across the border ans start transmission.

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You can visit and most likely be able to use your license, but to actually move, you'd need to reapply.

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    $\begingroup$ Hello HST, and welcome to Ham.SE. While this may in theory answer the question, we generally prefer answers to go into more detail than just a single sentence. You should try to edit the answer to expand on it and provide more detail. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Oct 30 '13 at 8:24

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