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How would a time difference of arrival-difference-of-arrival receiver with two antennas know which side the signal is from?

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An easy TDOA design by Byonics was published with the following schematic:

Two dipole antennas with a diode switcher controlled by a microcontroller feeding a radio

It appears that the antennas are switched at a rate of 640Hz, which allows a 640Hz tone to be heard in the radio when the antennas are not in phase. When the antennas are equidistant from the RF source, the tone goes away, so by turning the antenna and finding the null you can determine the direction of the source.

The author's description further explains:

Note that the transmitter being on that perpendicular line means that it could either be directly ahead, or directly behind. You would need to move some distance along the line of the antennas and take another bearing to determine which direction the transmitter actually was. In the next version, when the audio from the receiver is fed back into the chip and analyzed, it will be able to tell if the signal is coming from the left or rightwhen the audio from the receiver is fed back into the chip and analyzed, it will be able to tell if the signal is coming from the left or right when the tone is present, and light the appropriate LED. (emphasis added)

With the radio's audio going into the microcontroller, and the antennas out of phase with the source, what is the microcontroller looking for, or how would it tell, whether the signal is coming from the right or the left of the dipole array?

An easy TDOA design by Byonics was published with the following schematic:

Two dipole antennas with a diode switcher controlled by a microcontroller feeding a radio

It appears that the antennas are switched at a rate of 640Hz, which allows a 640Hz tone to be heard in the radio when the antennas are not in phase. When the antennas are equidistant from the RF source, the tone goes away, so by turning the antenna and finding the null you can determine the direction of the source.

The author's description further explains:

Note that the transmitter being on that perpendicular line means that it could either be directly ahead, or directly behind. You would need to move some distance along the line of the antennas and take another bearing to determine which direction the transmitter actually was. In the next version, when the audio from the receiver is fed back into the chip and analyzed, it will be able to tell if the signal is coming from the left or right when the tone is present, and light the appropriate LED.

With the radio's audio going into the microcontroller, and the antennas out of phase with the source, what is the microcontroller looking for, or how would it tell, whether the signal is coming from the right or the left of the dipole array?

An easy TDOA design by Byonics was published with the following schematic:

Two dipole antennas with a diode switcher controlled by a microcontroller feeding a radio

It appears that the antennas are switched at a rate of 640Hz, which allows a 640Hz tone to be heard in the radio when the antennas are not in phase. When the antennas are equidistant from the RF source, the tone goes away, so by turning the antenna and finding the null you can determine the direction of the source.

The author's description further explains:

Note that the transmitter being on that perpendicular line means that it could either be directly ahead, or directly behind. You would need to move some distance along the line of the antennas and take another bearing to determine which direction the transmitter actually was. In the next version, when the audio from the receiver is fed back into the chip and analyzed, it will be able to tell if the signal is coming from the left or right when the tone is present, and light the appropriate LED. (emphasis added)

With the radio's audio going into the microcontroller, and the antennas out of phase with the source, what is the microcontroller looking for, or how would it tell, whether the signal is coming from the right or the left of the dipole array?

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source | link

How would a time difference of arrival with two antennas know which side the signal is from?

An easy TDOA design by Byonics was published with the following schematic:

Two dipole antennas with a diode switcher controlled by a microcontroller feeding a radio

It appears that the antennas are switched at a rate of 640Hz, which allows a 640Hz tone to be heard in the radio when the antennas are not in phase. When the antennas are equidistant from the RF source, the tone goes away, so by turning the antenna and finding the null you can determine the direction of the source.

The author's description further explains:

Note that the transmitter being on that perpendicular line means that it could either be directly ahead, or directly behind. You would need to move some distance along the line of the antennas and take another bearing to determine which direction the transmitter actually was. In the next version, when the audio from the receiver is fed back into the chip and analyzed, it will be able to tell if the signal is coming from the left or right when the tone is present, and light the appropriate LED.

With the radio's audio going into the microcontroller, and the antennas out of phase with the source, what is the microcontroller looking for, or how would it tell, whether the signal is coming from the right or the left of the dipole array?