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The methodology needed to accurately calculate the radiated r-f power needed to generate a given field intensity at some distance along a terrestrial path is highly complex — probably beyond the practical possibility of posting in an answer here, even in outline form.

However, the U.S. FCC has developed a set of propagation charts relating to this topic, which provide a fairly straightforward way of answering this question for frequencies in the AM broadcast band.

Below is a link to a paper based on those propagation charts. It includes some background information along with several plots showing the distance to a groundwave field intensity of 0.5 mV/m, which is about the minimum field needed by a consumer-level AM broadcast receiver with a built-in antenna, given sufficiently low co- and adjacent-channel interference from other AM stations, and a receive site having sufficiently low ambient r-f noise levels.

Factors in MW Signal CoverageFactors in MW Signal Coverage

The methodology needed to accurately calculate the radiated r-f power needed to generate a given field intensity at some distance along a terrestrial path is highly complex — probably beyond the practical possibility of posting in an answer here, even in outline form.

However, the U.S. FCC has developed a set of propagation charts relating to this topic, which provide a fairly straightforward way of answering this question for frequencies in the AM broadcast band.

Below is a link to a paper based on those propagation charts. It includes some background information along with several plots showing the distance to a groundwave field intensity of 0.5 mV/m, which is about the minimum field needed by a consumer-level AM broadcast receiver with a built-in antenna, given sufficiently low co- and adjacent-channel interference from other AM stations, and a receive site having sufficiently low ambient r-f noise levels.

Factors in MW Signal Coverage

The methodology needed to accurately calculate the radiated r-f power needed to generate a given field intensity at some distance along a terrestrial path is highly complex — probably beyond the practical possibility of posting in an answer here, even in outline form.

However, the U.S. FCC has developed a set of propagation charts relating to this topic, which provide a fairly straightforward way of answering this question for frequencies in the AM broadcast band.

Below is a link to a paper based on those propagation charts. It includes some background information along with several plots showing the distance to a groundwave field intensity of 0.5 mV/m, which is about the minimum field needed by a consumer-level AM broadcast receiver with a built-in antenna, given sufficiently low co- and adjacent-channel interference from other AM stations, and a receive site having sufficiently low ambient r-f noise levels.

Factors in MW Signal Coverage

1
source | link

The methodology needed to accurately calculate the radiated r-f power needed to generate a given field intensity at some distance along a terrestrial path is highly complex — probably beyond the practical possibility of posting in an answer here, even in outline form.

However, the U.S. FCC has developed a set of propagation charts relating to this topic, which provide a fairly straightforward way of answering this question for frequencies in the AM broadcast band.

Below is a link to a paper based on those propagation charts. It includes some background information along with several plots showing the distance to a groundwave field intensity of 0.5 mV/m, which is about the minimum field needed by a consumer-level AM broadcast receiver with a built-in antenna, given sufficiently low co- and adjacent-channel interference from other AM stations, and a receive site having sufficiently low ambient r-f noise levels.

Factors in MW Signal Coverage